I’m on a crusade really, just to make people aware of what the prostate’s about. I was lucky, it was caught at an early stage. I’ve been treated. I was diagnosed in 2010, and I’m sat here today. I like to say that there’s a mammogram, but there’s no prostate-o-gram. We need to raise awareness of checks. I think sometimes going to the doctor freaks people out. You’ve got to be open with men. Because men, are insular, you know. Head in the sand sort of scenario. You have got to really make them open up. You’ve got to create a relaxed environment.

One guy I spoke with told me he had an enlarged prostate. So he knew what a prostate was, probably didn’t know where it was, but he knew he had an enlarged one. And then he told me that his brother had prostate cancer, and he said, what do I do next? I says, well you go to your GP and you discuss everything surrounding it and how it’s affecting you, and what to do next, and then you insist on a PSA test. But you’ve got to talk to the doctor first, you know. You can’t go in and say I want a PSA test. You’ve got to talk to the doctor, discuss the surrounding implications, especially your brother, your family, and then go for a PSA, and that was it. He went away happy.

If you can save one life by talking about cancer, because people are now aware, then it’s been worthwhile.

If you can save one life by talking about cancer, because people are now aware, then it’s been worthwhile.

Our growing network of Cancer Champions is at the heart of our cancer prevention work across Greater Manchester